Block L : October 18 – 10:15 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

Abstract:

This presentation is about the results of research examining the experiences of Indigenous women in university from a social justice perspective (Sen, 2010). The research strategy used is the multi-case study (Yin, 2012). The cases are two Quebec universities, one of which offers several services for Indigenous students, while the other offers very few. Following a typological analysis of the narrative of 19 Indigenous women (Schnapper, 2016), four typical profiles were created. These types show that the educational environment has a variable influence on the development of the respondents’ possibilities of achieving the chosen academic path. The results highlight the importance of paying attention not only to the resources available to these students, but also to their ability to use them, and to take into account the multiple axes of oppression intertwined in their academic career, particularly those related to the impacts of colonization (Collins & Bilge, 2016; Crenshaw, 1989). The presentation also shows the positive impact that university education has on Indigenous women in terms of empowerment, mobilization and resistance. The results presented can be used by the scientific community, Indigenous education organizations and higher education institutions to develop educational and support services customized to the realities of Indigenous students.

Abstract:

The goal of this presentation is to share an innovative project with actors and teachers in the field of general adult education. The project of academic success and perseverance of Indigenous students at École forestière de La Tuque aims to provide educational and personal support to students in a culturally safe environment, in collaboration with the Centre d’amitié autochtone de La Tuque and the Conseil de la Nation Atikamekw, to ensure enhancement of culture and the maintenance of the Atikamekw language. In fact, the school’s actors raised several obstacles to the success of First Nations students, who represent half of the school’s clientele. Following these findings, the creation of a safe environment has helped to develop a sense of belonging to the school in which Indigenous culture is present in different forms. The project also provides individualized support from a specialized educator and a resource teacher for learning the language of instruction in an adapted schedule. Various opportunities are available for Indigenous and non-Indigenous students to learn and share Indigenous traditions.

Abstract:

The purpose of this workshop is to present the realities and challenges facing the Commission scolaire du Fer and the Eastern Shores School Board in assisting and supporting Indigenous adult clienteles. Our five-year project, involving six school boards, aims to increase the rate and level of education of Indigenous adult students in general education and vocational training in Quebec public schools. Among other things, the project’s objectives and concrete actions, which the various project actors have initiated to meet these challenges, will be discussed. We will see how inclusion in urban centres and actions aimed at cultural safety can lead the clientele to feel truly concerned; how certain practices and strategies implemented by staff can contribute to the perseverance and success of this clientele; and, finally, how the involvement and collaboration of the various actors focusing on the clientele can make all the difference.

Abstract:

Kassinu Mamu is a small high school that is committed to the success of all its students. Success for all is a challenge that Kassinu Mamu wishes to meet every year and, to do so, everyone agrees that it is essential to know the students well, to work in teams and to implement a set of measures, of personalized practices and services. The school continuously assesses the needs of each student and makes the adjustments necessary for their success as the school year progresses. In this workshop, we will discuss measures, practices and services implemented at École Kassinu Mamu to ensure the certification or graduation of every student.

Whether working in a professional learning community (CAP), creating a personalized schedule for students, organizing remedial courses or using explicit teaching in the classrooms, this workshop will give you concrete directions related to the school organization plan that you will be able to reuse in your school.

Abstract:

During the Convention’s last edition, we discussed, during a workshop, the initiatives developed in our anthropology classes to help First Nations students assert themselves in class and take their place, but also to educate their non-Native colleagues. In 2018–2019, Cégep Limoilou welcomed approximately 65 First Nations students. This number, which has been steadily increasing in recent years, is dominated by Wendat from the Québec City region and Innu from the North Shore or Lac-Saint-Jean. We found that the realities experienced by students from these two nations were very different: one has French as mother tongue and the other, does not; one shares the majority Quebec phenotype, generally goes unnoticed in our classrooms and does not suffer from discrimination, while the other is openly subjected to it; one does not experience uprooting, the other does. In a concern for cultural safety for students of each of these nations, we wanted to present their particularities as well as the strategies and needs that are specific to them, as observed or collected from them, but also to report on benevolent pedagogical relationships to promote the personal and identity affirmation of students of each of these groups.

Abstract:

Participatory Research Histoire du Canada: perspectives des Premiers Peuples* (Canadian History: First Peoples Perspectives) aims to integrate the perspectives and history of the First Peoples by drawing on the expertise of the members of the eleven nations located on the territory today called the province of Quebec. This research focuses on two areas: meeting the needs of First Peoples in terms of preservation, sharing and transmission of knowledge; and enabling school institutions, guided by First Peoples’ members and knowledge bearers, to integrate Indigenous knowledge and perspectives into curricula. To do this, an online platform will allow the dissemination of material harvested according to a protocol established by each nation. They will also be involved in the development of teaching materials.

We believe that this reframing of history will begin the necessary transformation of mentalities allowing institutions to offer a living environment that will contribute to identity building and cultural safety of First Peoples students, thus promoting their perseverance and success in school. This workshop will be an opportunity to discuss the strategies to implement to make known the history and perspectives of First Peoples considering the realities of the eleven different nations involved and the challenges that it entails.