Block K : October 18 – 9:00 a.m. to 9:45 a.m.

Abstract:

The client/student-centred approach allows for the implementation of strategies promoting a holistic spectrum by using the medicine wheel, life cycles, identifying barriers, honouring the seven sacred teachings and understanding your healers. It is adaptable to any setting which is why we choose to share this best practice to all Indigenous and non-Indigenous partners. It is through these 7 layers that a student’s identity and/or organization and/or teaching materials can be strengthened with the inclusion of Indigenous cultural knowledge. It promotes a holistic vision that will support lifelong learners and therefore we strongly encourage academia and policy-makers to embrace this model.

We will be providing “hands-on” exercises and learning opportunities to help teachers/administrators to see how they can include cultural content within their learning program. These learning opportunities encourage teachers/administrators to play a supportive and active role within the lives of their students’ successes, by making the connection between the learner and their realities.

Participants will receive a copy of our PowerPoint, along with scenarios and opportunities to engage within small group exercises. This will allow participants to take our model and practically apply it to a student situation.

Abstract:

A study of the school transitions experienced by Indigenous students at the elementary and secondary levels in urban Quebec and the characteristics of these transitions will be discussed during this presentation. More than one hundred people, youths, family members, Friendship Centres and school community actors in five cities participated in this collaborative research conducted with the Regroupement des centres d’amitié autochtones du Québec (RCAAQ). In this workshop, some of the evidence from this research will be discussed: (a) The hypermobility of young people who go back and forth between different cities and between schools in the city and in the community; (b) Identification of the specific challenges posed by transitions for young people and their families (inseparable in understanding the impact of youth transitions); and (c) promising practices to support a seamless transition for students from services such as Native Friendship Centres or through programs enhancing collaboration and complementarity between the school environment and urban Indigenous organizations. This research points to the need to review and redefine current policies and practices in the education community and the Indigenous community to achieve sustainable gains in school success and retention to Indigenous students in urban environments.

Abstract:

Two years after the implementation of the Protection et exploitation de territoires fauniques—volet Premières Nations[1] (PETF—VPN), an adapted professional training project, 15 graduating Innu students from the first cohort enjoyed an inspiring stay in Haida Gwaii to integrate their traditions into their learning in order to preserve and reclaim the management of their territory. Through the story of a young graduate, now teaching in the new cohort of the PETF—VPN program and pursuing university studies in vocational education, you will discover how the completion of an internship at the end of the program has helped to consolidate some concepts and to foster student retention and success in learners.

In addition, this internship between nations in a community holding a cogency agreement for a national park has given rise to a major awareness among students to return to their community.

The realization of this project was made possible through a common approach of the following partners: the First Nations Adult Education (FNAE), Centre régional en éducation aux adultes de Uashat Mak Mani-Utenam (CREA), community of Uashat Mac Mani-Utenam (ITUM), the Commission scolaire des Rives-du-Saguenay School Board and Les Offices jeunesse internationaux du Québec (LOJIQ).

Abstract:

This presentation focuses on contextualizing the creation of the short undergraduate program in preschool education in Indigenous contexts at Université du Québec à Chicoutimi in partnership with the Tshakapesh Institute and the Centre des Premières Nations Nikanite. The creation of the program addresses a need for training to find sustainable solutions to ensure quality educational interventions for children aged 4-6 attending preschool classes in schools, members of the Tshakapesh Institute.

The team will present the program structure and practices co-developed by teachers and the professors to provide Innu children with an educational environment that meets their needs and values, their culture and language.  This sharing will reflect the challenges encountered, the practices that mobilize Indigenous knowledge, and strategies that meet the needs of Innu children.  Exchanges between the facilitators and the workshop participants will foster a common reflection to diversify and improve interventions in kindergarten classes.

 

Abstract:

As part of Plan d’action gouvernemental pour le développement social et culturel des Premières Nations et des Inuits 2017-2022, the Ministère de l’Éducation et de l’Enseignement supérieur (MEES) announced a measure to support the implementation of two pilot projects for Indigenous students accommodation shelters. The Regroupement des centres d’amitié autochtones du Québec (RCAAQ) was selected by the MEES as project manager, responsible for its planning and implementation, to be delivered by 2020–2021. The MEES’ primary intention with this initiative is to provide Indigenous students pursuing post-secondary education with housing that is safe and meets their needs so that housing does not become an added concern during their studies. It is understood that in addition to providing affordable housing, culturally relevant and integrated services will be provided to tenants and their families to reduce barriers to academic success, as well as to ensure that return or the continuation of studies is a success for all members of the family concerned. During this workshop, we will present the structure that has been implemented for the realization of these two pilot projects; the different steps previously taken, such as the results of the needs assessment; and, briefly, the different services provided within these two centres.