Block F : October 17 – 10:15 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

Abstract:

For many years now, many Indigenous educators, artists and leaders – to name only Ramsden (2012), Toulouse-Rose (2018), and Wente (2018) – have called on their non-Indigenous counterparts to engage in the process of ( re) conciliation and/or Indigenous cultural safety to proceed, first, to a certain self-assessment of their postures, their experiences, their attitudes, their beliefs/knowledge about the colonial realities of the territory.

During this workshop, I will, first, rely on my own doctoral research-creation approach articulated around the creation of a reflexive and transcultural comic strip.  This practice narrative about education by/for/about First Peoples in the Quebec system will open a reflection, then a dialogue about the posture of the teacher, the researcher or the non-Indigenous ally within school environments.  The second part of this workshop will call on respectful exchanges within a space that is at once safe, critical and indulgent.

Abstract:

This workshop aims to present the organization of two multi-level classes composed of young people with heterogeneous profiles. It will be hosted by two young school and social adaptation teachers recently graduated from two Quebec universities and who met in the community of Uashat mak Mani-Utenam. Now homeroom teachers of two special education classes from a community elementary school, they are collaborating to create an effective class structure and stimulating projects for their students. They rely on caring and sharing between learners aged 6 to 12 years old. During this workshop, they will share their vision of special education teaching and present projects done with their students. Finally, they will provide a structure meeting the challenges of multi-level classes on a daily basis.

Abstract:

Recognizing that the realities of Indigenous students are different from those of other students, it is imperative to understand and consider the needs of Indigenous students in order to effectively address the socio-economic, structural and institutional barriers that impede Indigenous youth’s access to and success in post-secondary education. For example, as part of the implementation of a provincial strategy for urban Indigenous education, the Regroupement des centres d’amitié autochtones du Québec (RCAAQ) conducted a participatory research project to promote and support social innovation in terms of school perseverance for Indigenous students in Quebec.

This project has highlighted inspiring initiatives implemented in various post-secondary institutions as well as in urban Indigenous organizations. During this workshop, the results of this research project will be presented as well as a toolbox developed to facilitate the transfer of knowledge acquired throughout the research project. Representatives from the RCAAQ will also present innovative intervention models that promote dialogue, complementarity and collaboration between the resources of post-secondary institutions and those of Native Friendship centres.

Abstract:

Becoming educated should never be about losing one’s language, culture or identity. Sadly, this has been a historical reality for Indigenous people in Canada. The introduction of residential schools, Indian Day Schools, the policy surrounding the Sixties Scoop and other government policies have negatively affected our languages, cultures, and identities of Indigenous people in Canada directly and indirectly over generations. Dr. Marie Battiste, the esteemed Author and Educator, speaks not only to the needs of the Mi’kmaq but to all indigenous peoples, “The Educational System needs to shift from viewing/presenting Mi’kmaq from deficiency to accomplishment, from misunderstanding to respect, from exasperation to pride, and from division to cooperation.”

Cultural proficiency is the policies and practices in an organization or the values and behaviour of an individual, that enables the person or institution to engage effectively with people and groups who are different from them. Cultural Proficiency is an inside-out approach that influences how people relate to their colleagues, clients and community. Cultural Proficiency is a lens for examining one’s work and one’s relationships (Nuri-Robins & al., 2012). Using the model of cultural proficiency and culturally responsive teaching, I will present in greater detail the necessity and methodology by which the educational system can begin to incorporate indigenous academic knowledge in all subject areas. The three pillars to ensure student success, relationship, content and pedagogy, will also be examined.

 Abstract:

In analyzing the academic difficulties of Indigenous students, the historically predominant cultural approach in Quebec has placed little emphasis on the structural inequality of power relations. In the absence of a challenge to the system of oppression that is the foundation of Canadian society, the discourse of reconciliation may appear as a new form of domination unilaterally imposed on Indigenous peoples (Motha, 2007). In this presentation, I will show the limits of approaches based exclusively on the notion of “cultural difference” when they do not examine social structures reproducing inequalities. I will present another interpretive trend, from Critical Racial Theories, based on an analysis of systemic racism. From this perspective, educational inequalities cannot be explained solely because Indigenous people are culturally shocked, but because they are oppressed by colonial society. Based on the results of my doctoral research aimed at understanding the experience of 24 First Nations University students, I will show how the analysis of systemic racism redefines the terms of the debate and the measures to be taken to counter the inequalities in education.

 Abstract:

It is important for Indigenous students, young and old, to develop pride in their cultural and linguistic identity. To assist them in this process, the practitioners, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous, must understand the characteristics of their students’ Indigenous mother tongue and those of the language of instruction. In doing so, they will be able to better direct their interventions and adapt their teaching. In this workshop, we will first discuss the linguistic factors of cultural safety and academic success. The participants will then work as a team for an “expert” type activity to explore the linguistic factors involved: phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics. Finally, a guided discussion will take place to find solutions to adapt teaching to the linguistic aspects identified. Bring pencils, paper, phone or tablet with Internet access to participate in this interactive workshop.