Block E : October 16 – 3:45 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Abstract:

The relative importance of a campaign to promote education in Nunavik is not in doubt. Such a campaign must translate into messages at the national, regional and local levels. To fight against poverty through education, Esuma: the School Perseverance Issue Table in Nunavik was created in 2013. Isuma is more than a word in Inuktitut; it is a concept. Isuma means to think, to be competent, to progress and to learn. The initial “I” has been replaced by an “E” to emphasize the importance of education. Esuma’s mission is to create synergy throughout Nunavik and improve educational measures so that all learners persevere in their efforts to succeed. This workshop will discuss the mobilizing process with the Nunavik organizations that created the Table. We will review promising projects and their impact on communities. We will address the key challenges encountered and present our three-year action plan to engage the population at both local and regional levels to achieve sustainable development.

Abstract:

The links between perseverance, academic success, and reading motivation are found in many studies, but how can we motivate our Innu students to read more and make the choice to read? Our observations from the community indicated that female teachers with a reading corner tended to allocate more reading time to students, while the lack of reading nooks seemed to contribute to a student’s loss of motivation from year to year. In February 2019, with the approval of the management of each of the two primary schools of Uashat mak Mani-utenam, the reading corner project started with a student survey, then the presentation of a plan to the school staff members. To facilitate the installation of the corners, we chose 19 different themes from Preschool to Grade 6 for the 34 classrooms. Each reading corner has been thought and designed to fit harmoniously into each classroom. In this workshop, we will present, with pictures, the experience of the reading corners layout in the schools as well as the tools proposed to the teachers to make them their own. The participants in the workshop will also be able to discuss with the educational advisor and the consultant about the progress of the project, the proposed tools and the impact on the motivation of teachers and Innu students from preschool to the third cycle of the primary level.

Abstract:

This presentation is about the five-year partnership between the First Nations Education Council (FNEC) and Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières (UQTR), from 2015 to 2019. During these years, nearly 100 school counsellors, about 20 participants per year, followed a 30-hour continuous training course over two weekends. We will present the main topics covered during the training days: from the assessment of students’ needs and difficulties to the concept of inclusive education, including multilingualism, school-family-community collaboration, classroom management, pedagogical differentiation and learning climate.

We will also discuss the different pedagogical strategies, including Indigenous pedagogy based on cultural identity consideration; the Kolb Cycle promoting experiential approach; the use of visual supports aimed at understanding notions and transferring knowledge; drawing; discussions; work in subgroups, and ad hoc syntheses to promote application in school environments. In conclusion, we will discuss the respective learning experiences of this training, what we call cultural meeting, emphasizing the importance of continuing education and training in school environments.

Abstract:

Young people living in Indigenous communities face systemic and socio-economic barriers. It is in this context that the community of Mashteuiatsh has implemented the School and Social Support Project Programme d’accompagnement scolaire et social (PASS) aimed at giving young people in the community equal opportunities to succeed in their studies, by promoting strengthening of their personal and family potential as well as their resilience. The purpose of this workshop is to present the PASS project, to illustrate the support practices offered to young Pekuakamiulnuatsh, the challenges encountered as well as the strategies deployed to cope with them. We will also discuss the support process offered to parent-student counselors by the Université du Québec à Chicoutimi (UQAC). This project is a good example of social innovation, since it is the only one fully in line with an Indigenous community in Quebec, among all the projects funded by Passways to Education Canada.

Abstract:

The presentation offers a review of two projects in two different contexts, aimed at furthering reflection on collaborative practices in school and community settings to promote inclusion, perseverance and academic success. The Indigenous Science, Technology and Cultures project in Brazil involves youth and community elders in an exchange and dialogue around the astronomical knowledge of the Guarani Mbya people of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The other activity from the Inunguinniq project (the creation of a capable and autonomous human being) is an environmental monitoring program that aims to determine the links between climate change and the quantity and quality of water in the Pond Inlet watershed, in Nunavut. In this workshop, we will present the two projects and conduct an analysis of their impact on the training of Indigenous youth, while exposing the implications of an education rooted in the values and practices of these peoples. Inspired by the theme of the conference, Further Together, we will learn from these collaborations for an inclusive education system that promotes the rights of First Peoples.

Abstract:

For two years now, I have been teaching workshops to non-Native groups in the Minganie region. This presentation will aim to highlight the objectives, the approach and the outlines. These workshops address, among other things, the orality of First Nations, the unknown aspects of certain chapters in Canadian history and the cultural diversity of First Nations, the legal context, the imposition of the education system based on the European model and its impacts. The methodology is based on the five senses: sight, smell, taste, touch and hearing. For example, using Innu music as part of the Innu language makes it possible to hear its sound and beauty. The approach advocated is rooted in the traditional teaching received from my parents and my grandmother, in my academic background, in my work experience, in my personal research and in my exchanges with the elders of other Innu communities. Parallels with my personal story, supported by photos and objects, are made to demonstrate the evolution of the Innu people through time. The overall goal of these workshops is to reduce prejudices against First Nations, to show that they have a place in society, to bring about rapprochement and to reinforce the identity of young people through the story as it is told by the elders.

[1] School and Social Support Project