Block D : October 16 – 2:30 p.m. to 3:15 p.m.

Abstract:

Under new support measures provided by the Ministry of Education, the Western Quebec School Board has been able to hire liaison officers in the communities of Maniwaki and Val d’Or. Working with community organizations and partners (among them Friendship Centres, Health and Social Services agencies, etc.), Indigenous community members and knowledge holders the agents are providing key support to students and families beyond the classroom. These support and outreach partnerships are helping to ensure retention, success, and more positive educational experiences for our students. The collaborations have also reinforcement relationships with Indigenous communities, provided trust building opportunities and created an increased sense of belonging of both students and extended families.

Abstract:

This presentation features the results of an action research (AR) that took place from 2016 to 2019 in an Indigenous community; it aimed to support the professional development of elementary school teachers in terms of teaching and assessment of writing (reading-writing). During the RA, each class was equipped with a literature corner; two book fairs were organized in the school to, among other things, fill these spaces; and several training sessions were offered to the teachers (teaching of reading and writing, evaluation, etc.). At the end of the project, what are the benefits of the AR for the students, the teachers, the community? During our presentation, we will review the AR and present tools designed by and/or for the teachers to keep track of the knowledge acquired and transfer it to other teaching contexts. It should be noted that, methodologically, this AR was structured around working groups including an enlarged committee, which determined the training needs, and a select committee, which was in charge of operationalizing responses to these needs. Each group included actors from the practice community (teachers and pedagogical advisers), an elder (retired teacher), and university researchers.

Abstract:

The persistence of academic and social difficulties among Indigenous youth, living in both urban and Indigenous communities, highlights the urgency of considering the implementation of innovative and effective practices to prevent early school leaving and increase integration into employment with this target group. The Centre d’innovation des Premiers Peuples (CIPP) has established the first Fab Lab (collaborative manufacturing workshop) in Canada, the Fab Lab ONAKI, in addition to developing a Fab Lab mobile to reach Indigenous youth living in remote communities. The Fab Labs offer the opportunity to explore different creation and manufacturing avenues by providing users with a safe place and advanced equipment such as 3D printers and laser cut-outs. The work in the Fab Lab is done in a spirit of sharing knowledge between users. Through a totally innovative initiative in the digital era, the Fab Lab ONAKI experience has led young Indigenous drop-outs to experience significant success after having often experienced a succession of academic failures. This workshop is about this initiative as well as the process of social transformation that follows.

Abstract:

Kativik llisarniliriniq, in partnership with Frontier College, has deployed a three-year Math and Literacy Tutoring Program across Nunavik to provide extra support to high school students. This tutoring program focuses on understanding basic math concepts with a gradual integration of more advanced concepts while developing solid study skills and building student self-confidence. When necessary, tutors also focus on building literacy skills.

They offer a flexible service adapted to the needs of the students and the tutors’ primary purpose is to support secondary III, IV and V students who need support in math.

Their mandate is threefold:

—Build relationships with and provide support to secondary III, IV, and V students during their math classes.

—Provide targeted one-on-one or small-group tutoring sessions outside of class hours.

—Offer literacy programming to students and the wider community, especially if literacy is one of the obstacles to progressing in math. During the presentation, the impact on academic achievements and on attitude towards school and learning will be presented as well as key learning from years 1 and 2.

Abstract:

Les décrocheurs d’étoiles has become an entrepreneurial project. The idea emerged when we asked students to identify with an inspiring personality or person and that a majority of our Indigenous students were unable to do so. After discussing with them, we decided to overcome this gap. Throughout the school year, students discover inspiring Indigenous and non-Indigenous personalities. In the process, students reconnect with their roots. This project is taking place in two special education classrooms at Centrale Elementary School located in La Tuque, classes in which 17 out of 21 students are Indigenous. It aims to embrace the Atikamekw culture, increase self-esteem and promote openness. By discovering inspirational personalities, students share their discoveries with all students in the school, their families, and the community. Students must write a letter to the chosen personality and invite them to school. Through this project, they learned how to make bannock, dream catchers and beadwork. This year, they decided to develop a French/Atikamekw dictionary. Soon, they will make video clips for other students to learn to pronounce the words. For the last two years, they have also been singing in Atikamekw. We teach our school subjects through this project, for example, writing a three-part story from the album Le voyage d’Anoki or discovering the legend of Aastenstic in ethics. Since this project began, there have been many benefits: for example, this year, for the first time in five years, we heard our students say they were proud to be Atikamekw. In this workshop, we will discuss this entrepreneurial project, its various stages and the various educational projects related to it.

 Abstract:

This workshop is about teaching strategies allowing elementary students, for whom the language of instruction is a second language, to optimize their learning in the language of instruction (French). These strategies are the result of observations and direct classroom interventions in various Innu communities. This workshop is a sharing of experiences based on speech and language therapy and remediation principles: the principle of explicit vocabulary learning, that of letter awareness, that of phonological awareness, and the alphabetical principle. These methods have had a positive impact in solving problems in mathematics as well as in reading comprehension. Concrete examples of positive learning situations will be shared. This workshop will be interactive while providing practical ideas experienced by students in the classroom. As a participant, you will have a new perspective on learning in a bilingual context.