Block C : October 16 – 1:30 p.m. to 2:15 p.m.

 

Abstract:

The Nova Career Centre is located on traditional Kanien’kehá: ka (Mohawk) territory and is neighbours with the Kanien’kehá: ka community of Kahnawake. A significant portion of the centre’s students are Kanien’kehá: ka. Attending to student needs, as well as a response to the TRC’s Calls to Action, Bonnie Mitchell (Centre Director and Settler Ally) and Curran Jacobs (Indigenous Resource Teacher and Mohawk from Kahnawake) have come together to pilot several initiatives in pursuit of indigenizing the Nova Career Centre. Through the creation of our Indigenous Resource Centre—the Sken: nen (Peace) Centre—we have begun to bring awareness to our Indigenous learners by creating visible space, providing professional development to staff, sharing culture and knowledge through centre wide festivals and activities as well as providing support for Indigenous students that is wholistic and culturally rooted. In this presentation, we would like to tell our story of navigating the adult sector in pursuit of reconciliation and providing necessary support for Indigenous learners. We would like to reflect on the impacts and outcomes of this project and discuss where we are and where we’re going.

 

Abstract:

This workshop is about the Petapan project at école des Quatre-vents of Commission scolaire des Rives-du-Saguenay: its educational goals, its organizational structure as well as the links of collaboration established with various partners to develop practices aimed at supporting the success of Indigenous students in urban areas. The team will present practices developed (2017–2019) by managers, teachers, language and cultural facilitators, professionals and school staff to provide Indigenous students with a welcoming and safe school environment that values their language and their culture. An analysis of these practices will make it possible to identify elements to consolidate and others to develop in a perspective of continuous improvement. It is in a spirit of sharing experience that the facilitators of this workshop will testify and discuss with the participants.

Abstract:

Three Québec City CÉGEPs have joined forces in an innovative project for the academic success and perseverance of Indigenous students. This project aims, among other things, to hire a resource person to support and supervise Indigenous students as well as raise awareness of the college communities to these students’ realities. The presence of the student life counselor in three Québec City CEGEPs (Cégep Garneau, Cégep de Sainte-Foy and Cégep Limoilou) is an essential support for these students’ academic career, which is often fraught with cultural, linguistic, psychosocial, economic and territorial challenges. In addition, Cégep Garneau has put in place accommodations to allow additional time for evaluations. This workshop will present the main lines of this project as well as the steps taken to implement accommodations.

Abstract:

For many years, Cégep de Baie-Comeau has been committed to fostering the integration and adaptation of Indigenous students within its institution. The Guide d’intervention institutionnelle pour favoriser la réussite éducative des étudiantes et des étudiants autochtones[1] of Cégep de Baie-Comeau, developed with the Centre des Premières Nations Nikanite de l’Université du Québec à Chicoutimi (UQAC) with the support of the Centre local d’emploi et de formation de Betsiamites, is a good example. In order to go further, the teachers of the Department of Social Sciences and Humanities have established a pedagogical project aimed at integrating more content related to Indigenous cultures into all social studies courses in the program. Since most of our Indigenous students come from the Innu communities of the North Shore, a special place will be given to Innu culture. In this sense, we are working with the staff at Uashkaikan Secondary School in Pessamit and with the Pessamit Band Council to align our practices and enrich our knowledge of Innu culture and this community. The presentation will be an opportunity to share the practices implemented in the Department of Social Sciences and Humanities of Cégep de Baie-Comeau.

Abstract:

Fusion Jeunesse’s mission is to contribute to school perseverance, employability and civic engagement by implementing innovative experiential learning projects that create ongoing connections between school environments and the community. To achieve this, Fusion Jeunesse hires students or new graduates from across Canada to send them to live in the Indigenous communities where they will develop projects. The main challenge of this approach is certainly the integration of non-Indigenous coordinators within the communities. Fusion Jeunesse enjoys enviable social acceptability, as evidenced by its growing presence in Indigenous communities: presence in 2 communities in 2009 and in 23 communities in 7 nations in 2018.

This expansion is based exclusively on project applications coming directly from local actors such as regional committees and the different educational communities. It is likely that this increased presence is largely due to the quality of the training that is provided to project coordinators.

Abstract:

Certain students, of which Indigenous students, need professional assistance to succeed. This assistance can take different forms: direct interventions with pupils, training for teachers, support for teachers, etc. Considering the distance between Indigenous communities and professionals, the teleservice option is becoming increasingly attractive. Studies show that the use of teleservices for professional therapeutic follow-up is effective in certain fields, such as audiology and speech-language pathology. Our team has been working by teleservice for four years now and has been able to test the practical and technical aspects of such a service and become aware of the various challenges it presents. Practical demonstrations will be conducted during the workshop so that you can familiarize yourself with the various easily accessible tools that could eventually lead the implementation of a simple, efficient and inexpensive remote service. Bring your laptops or tablets to participate in activities. If you do not have these tools, we will form teams and lend you the necessary materials during the worksho

[1] The Guide to Institutional Intervention to Promote Educational Success for Indigenous Students