Block B : October 16 – 11:15 a.m. to 12:00 a.m.

Abstract:

**This presentation is a 90-minute roundtable activity. **

How to better understand the realities, issues and challenges facing today’s educational success?   This central issue is at the root of Alliance Kapakan’s work in developing, in interactive and collaborative mode, new knowledge and reference tools documenting Indigenous knowledge, approaches and practices in transmission and lifelong learning at any age. This work aims first at revising the very notion of educational success that is still too often limited to academic success alone. By focusing on Indigenous knowledge systems in their wholeness and community applications, we can see the emergence of keys of understanding and action modulating both individual and collective life courses and inform us about the ways of building, to sustain and share the knowledge in a broad sense. This work then aims to explore the bridges that can be built between knowledge systems that are based on values and principles sometimes complementary but often different: Indigenous systems, on the one hand, and Western systems on the other.

This roundtable will allow us to present the first results obtained during the holding of some recent collaborative workshops in Indigenous territories.

Moreover, in addition to the actual results of our work, the roundtable will also be an opportunity to discuss the methodological, epistemological and ethical modalities that feed our integrated approach to co-construction and knowledge mobilization. Indeed, since our work fits directly into the major debates on the emergence and deployment of knowledge societies and their contribution to the cultural and social heritage of humanity, they imply that a reflection must also be given to the role and scope of an intellectual approach that can become a vector of recognition and social transformation.

Abstract:

Literacy skills are critical to ensuring student retention and academic success. The Cree School Board (CSB) serving the residents of Eeyou Eenou Istchee is committed to addressing the literacy needs of all students. The CSB Response to Intervention (RTI) initiative was implemented to address the significant gaps in students’ reading skills which impede them from reaching grade level reading competency. The goal of this initiative is to ensure that every student receives the support and additional time needed to improve their reading abilities in Cree, English and French by offering high-quality instruction in the general education classroom and supplementary tiers. The foundation of the CSB RTI framework is based on segments of learning called RTI Sequences. During the RTI Sequences teachers work collaboratively to monitor student learning and adjust their instructions to ensure students successfully attain grade level reading competency. The data indicates significant gains in student reading achievement in general education and supplementary instruction.

In this workshop we will highlight the success and challenges of implementing the CSB RTI initiative across nine schools in the Cree School Board. The CSB RTI framework will be presented. Participants will have an opportunity to analyze student data and work with accompanying RTI supporting documents.

Abstract:

During the 2018–2019 school year, the Cégep de Chicoutimi, with the support of La Boite Rouge vif, created a 30-minute documentary film to demonstrate the academic success of Indigenous students. The purpose was to capture school life stories summarizing different post-secondary pathways to better understand the experiences of students, the difficulties they face, what motivates them, and the type of support that ensures their academic perseverance. With the title Tu m’inspires, the documentary features the stories of six former Indigenous students who graduated from college. There is a diversity of experiences: the students interviewed come from several communities, different generations, different training and work sectors in urban or community settings. During the workshop, participants will watch the film. Following the film screening, there will be a discussion on the strategies and the appropriate attitudes and means to implement to increase the academic success of Indigenous students. This documentary has already been seen by the students who participated, and they loved it, since it reflects significant elements that contributed to their perseverance. After the Convention, the documentary will be made available to educational institutions: it can be used in a training or motivation context, these former students can become inspiring models for students in training, both at the secondary education and at the post-secondary level.

Abstract:

Eeyou-EenouItuun, or stewardship of a Cree territory, is an Attestation of Collegiate Studies (AEC) intended to bring Cree students to become stewards of a Cree territory (EeyouItuun). This training shows that the Ministère de l’Éducation et de l’Enseignement supérieur (MEES) recognizes this role present in the First Peoples. As stewards, students will be responsible for managing the use of natural resources and land by users of the family trapline, while respecting Cree traditions and in a sustainable development perspective. Since the 1970s, several attempts were made to create this training. However, each of these attempts was based on a model from either of the two cultures, Indigenous or non-Indigenous. The peculiarity of this new attempt is to use the models of both cultures. The objectives of this presentation are to present: 1—an example of how the principles of the Canadian Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) can be applied in the development of college-level training; and 2—the obstacles encountered, and the solutions elaborated during the development of this AEC and during implementation in the communities.

Abstract:

Kiuna Institution, in partnership with Offices jeunesse internationaux du Québec, has developed a cultural project aimed at perseverance in school. In the spring of 2019, students from the Kiuna Institution, a rather large clientele between the ages of 18 and 30, had the chance to experience a cultural exchange with Indigenous people from around the world as part of the Gathering of Nations 2019, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. In addition to discovering Indigenous pride in an international event, students had the opportunity to present the First Nations of Quebec through a project integrated with teaching and social and cultural activities. The courses concerned by this project are Communication (English) and Introduction to the History of North America’s Indigenous Peoples. In this workshop, we will discuss the project’s impact: among other things, the involvement and commitment of students who have helped to encourage school perseverance.

Abstract:

The year 2019 marks the centenary of the opening of the Waldorf School, the first to apply Steiner’s educational principles. More than one thousand schools around the world are inspired today, including schools in some Indigenous communities in Canada and Quebec. After briefly presenting the history of Steiner-Waldorf pedagogy, we will detail the parallels between this educational approach and the traditional Indigenous perspective: belief in reincarnation, holistic view of the child, spiritual dimension of development; the importance of orality, of arts, of movement, of songs, of stories, languages, manual work with natural materials, of the relationship to the surrounding environment, and of free play. Teaching materials (wool animals, wooden toys) and works by children will be exhibited: drawings, watercolours, beeswax and wood carvings, weaved, knitted and crocheted confections, cross-stitching, notebooks.

Participants will be invited to perform a sequence of language-learning activities. Finally, a speaking circle will end the workshop.