Block A : October 16 – 10:15 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

Abstract:

**This presentation is a 90-minute roundtable activity. **

How to better understand the realities, issues and challenges facing today’s educational success?   This central issue is at the root of Alliance Kapakan’s work in developing, in interactive and collaborative mode, new knowledge and reference tools documenting Indigenous knowledge, approaches and practices in transmission and lifelong learning at any age. This work aims first at revising the very notion of educational success that is still too often limited to academic success alone. By focusing on Indigenous knowledge systems in their wholeness and community applications, we can see the emergence of keys of understanding and action modulating both individual and collective life courses and inform us about the ways of building, to sustain and share the knowledge in a broad sense. This work then aims to explore the bridges that can be built between knowledge systems that are based on values and principles sometimes complementary but often different: Indigenous systems, on the one hand, and Western systems on the other.

This roundtable will allow us to present the first results obtained during the holding of some recent collaborative workshops in Indigenous territories.

Moreover, in addition to the actual results of our work, the roundtable will also be an opportunity to discuss the methodological, epistemological and ethical modalities that feed our integrated approach to co-construction and knowledge mobilization. Indeed, since our work fits directly into the major debates on the emergence and deployment of knowledge societies and their contribution to the cultural and social heritage of humanity, they imply that a reflection must also be given to the role and scope of an intellectual approach that can become a vector of recognition and social transformation.

Abstract:

The Tshakapesh Institute is committed to cultural safety, which helps to acknowledge the presence of Innu students in the various educational institutions they attend.   For several years now, the regional organization, representing seven Innu communities, has been trying to acknowledge the peculiarities of its school clientele by giving priority to winning practices. Through this presentation, the Tshakapesh Institute wishes to share the project of regrouping all these winning practices contributing to cultural safety in a perspective of optimal academic success. Tshetshi tshissenitakanit: Welcome Kit for the non-Native Intervenors will be available in the fall of 2019 and will address all levels of education. The content of this kit is very diversified, and its primary objective is to raise awareness among intervenors of the unique characteristics of Innu students and, to a greater extent, First Nations students as well. The presentation will go through the elements included in the kit and all its possible uses in the different school environments. Several existing tools have been grouped together and adapted. In addition, activity sheets have been created to complement the material presented. This kit is a turnkey option for schools that wish to actively participate in the cultural safety of First Nations students, and therefore promote their academic success.

 Abstract:

The project that will be discussed in this workshop aims to provide services adapted to students attending the general education of adults (Formation générale des adultes – FGA) in Pessamit. After noting that the basic general secondary education offered to regular groups did not meet the needs and/or abilities of some students, a working group composed Pessamit and Commission scolaire de l’estuaire representatives have set up a customized project for these adult students with different functional limitations. The professionals wish to foster the commitment, perseverance and success of Pessamit students in an environment adapted to their needs. The project addresses topics such as problem solving, communication, civic responsibilities, domestic, work and family skills, personal care, the use of external resources, sexuality, reading, writing, mathematics and psychomotility. Students therefore acquire various essential skills to develop healthy lifestyles, to integrate successfully into the labour market and to learn to integrate better into society and to make better use of their learning. Without the collaboration of professionals from both backgrounds, this project would not have been possible. During this presentation, participants will learn about the development of this project and its continuity.

Abstract:

Significant health disparities exist between Indigenous peoples in Canada and other Canadians. At the same time, there is increasing recognition that Indigenous peoples possess the knowledge, rooted in their varied traditions and cultures, to meet this societal health challenge. The Indigenous Health Professions Program (IHPP) recognizes this and looks to improve the health of Indigenous peoples in Canada by recruiting and training more Indigenous health care practitioners. IHPP looks back to early adolescence as a moment when a change to the way Indigenous youth are engaged in the areas of science could encourage a ripple effect through their education. The Eagle Spirit Science Futures (ESSF) Camp does this by providing an intensive summer program for Indigenous students, with a curriculum that has been shaped by educators, youth and Elders to integrate both the required Quebec curriculum and Indigenous ways of knowing in a hands-on approach to science that is meaningful and exciting to Indigenous youth. We further engage participants following the camp through a free Electronic Tutoring and Mentoring (eTM) Program. Each participant is paired with a currently enrolled McGill health student who can support the participants through the obstacles they will inevitably face in their academic journey.

Abstract:

The goal of this presentation is to share an innovative project with actors and teachers in the field of general adult education. The project of academic success and perseverance of Indigenous students at École forestière de La Tuque aims to provide educational and personal support to students in a culturally safe environment, in collaboration with the Centre d’amitié autochtone de La Tuque and the Conseil de la Nation Atikamekw, to ensure enhancement of culture and the maintenance of the Atikamekw language. In fact, the school’s actors raised several obstacles to the success of First Nations students, who represent half of the school’s clientele. Following these findings, the creation of a safe environment has helped to develop a sense of belonging to the school in which Indigenous culture is present in different forms. The project also provides individualized support from a specialized educator and a resource teacher for learning the language of instruction in an adapted schedule. Various opportunities are available for Indigenous and non-Indigenous students to learn and share Indigenous traditions.

Abstract:

The Kiuna Institution psychosocial services have always been considered a priority given the difficulties that First Nations students may experience. In fact, in addition to the many academic challenges, there are psychosocial difficulties that are attributable to the reality of First Nations. For many, these difficulties are often amplified by leaving the community for the first time. By combining well-being, personal growth and identity strengthening, Kiuna’s psychosocial services have the primary objective of promoting learning availability. Since the development of psychosocial services in 2013, they have evolved to take into account the characteristics of our student population, for example, considering the reality of the families that often accompany students who leave their community to study. The addition of new resources and the development of an intervention mode adapted to the specific needs of First Nations students allows us to continue to develop Kiuna Institution’s psychosocial services. In this workshop, we will present our insights into the fundamental importance of adapted psychosocial services as well as their evolution in Kiuna before discussing how we integrate them into the academic process, since psychosocial challenges are often inseparable from it.